Mohammed Bashir Zaheer (pictured) was stabbed to death on the morning of July 16, 2020. He is pictured six months earlier at a family wedding

Mohammed Bashir Zaheer (pictured) was stabbed to death on the morning of July 16, 2020. He is pictured six months earlier at a family wedding

A security guard who stabbed his best friend of 25 years was not ‘criminally responsible’ for the crime due to substantial mental health issues, a court has found.

Within hours of the bloody attack on Mohammed Bashir Zaheer on July 16 2020, Jawid Jawid, 43, told doctors of his intention to plead under the mental health laws.

The pair had known each other for 25 years after meeting in India in their early 20s before moving to Australia. Their families had both fled Afghanistan.

They were working together at the Mirage apartment block in Pyrmont, where Mr Zaheer worked as a building manager and employed Jawid as his assistant.

But the relationship slowly deteriorated as Jawid became increasingly paranoid that Mr Zaheer was ‘out to get him’, culminating in a confrontation in the foyer of the building on July 16.

Witnesses saw Jawid stab Mr Zaheer several times over before walking away from his friend, who was bleeding out with multiple wounds to his neck, head and torso.

Jawid was later found drunk and passed out in a parking garage in Parramatta. He was taken to hospital where he made several unsolicited admissions about the incident.

While he was being assessed by a doctor, Jawid asked the doctor to ‘help him out’ by diagnosing him with a mental health condition.

‘Come on Doc. Mental health, what do you think? Sign some papers and say it’s mental health,’ the court heard.

Jawid Jawid, 41, (pictured) admitted to stabbing his friend of 25 years but pleaded not guilty to murder by way of a mental health impairment

Jawid Jawid, 41, (pictured) admitted to stabbing his friend of 25 years but pleaded not guilty to murder by way of a mental health impairment

Jawid went on to explain he’d ‘done it in the past’ and ‘beaten this sort of thing six times’.  

‘I have a good lawyer he will get me off no problems, mental health is easy… what you think?’

In spite of bragging about using mental health as a defence in court, Jawid was indeed found not criminally responsible for his actions on the day of his friend’s death.

The court determined he was suffering from a psychotic disorder and an anxiety disorder which impaired his judgement at the time of the assault.

‘He did not know that the act of stabbing the deceased was wrong, in that he could not reason with a moderate degree of sense and composure about whether the act as perceived by reasonable people was wrong. This was because of his systematised persecutory delusional belief relating to the deceased,’ the court heard.

Two psychiatrists determined he ‘understood the nature and quality of his act but did not know that the act was wrong’.

Mr Zaheer (pictured) on a trip to the Blue Mountains about seven years ago as he was working his way up the security industry ladder. Mr Zaheer had been friends with Jawid for 25 years and gave him a job in Australia after they both moved from India

Mr Zaheer (pictured) on a trip to the Blue Mountains about seven years ago as he was working his way up the security industry ladder. Mr Zaheer had been friends with Jawid for 25 years and gave him a job in Australia after they both moved from India

Jawid told police Mr Zaheer had ‘tortured him’ in the months leading to the attack and had ‘taken everything from him’.

He believed Mr Zaheer had naked pictures of him, had drugged him and alleged he was ‘sodomised with a bottle’. 

Later conversations between Jawid and investigating officers revealed he believed a gang was after him and ‘they were playing with his head’, adding the ‘deceased just wanted to get him drunk so he could kill him’. 

The court heard Jawid had been admitted to hospital eight times over mental health issues, and two weeks earlier had tried to take his own life. 

Jawid’s lawyer also argued in court his client suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder after fleeing war-torn Afghanistan. 

Jawid told police Mr Zaheer had ‘tortured him’ in the months leading to the attack and had ‘taken everything from him’ 

A woman (pictured) was seen being helped by loved ones as she rushed to the scene of the crime

A woman (pictured) was seen being helped by loved ones as she rushed to the scene of the crime

Mr Zaheer moved to Australia in 1998 and Jawid followed a couple of years later, and was eventually given a job at his old friend’s security company.  

Ex-brother-in-law Jamil ‘AJ’ Hefan previously told Daily Mail Australia that Mr Zaheer saved Jawid’s life when he was stabbed in the stomach in India.

‘Bashir helped him to the hospital and gave him money to help him recover,’ he said.

Mr Hefan said Mr Zaheer was a devout Muslim who prayed five times a day, and never drank alcohol, smoked, or ‘even looked at another man’s woman’.

‘His two sisters relied on him. What a guy… I just can’t believe he’s gone, he didn’t deserve this,’ he said.

Post source: The List

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