A TikTok user has shocked followers after revealing she ‘accidentally’ mixed bleach and vinegar together in an error that saw her entire family put on lockdown.

Samantha, who goes by @silkalmondmilk_ers on the video-sharing platform, discovered the hard way that combining cleaning supplies did not make them stronger and, in fact, makes them poisonous. 

She revealed that she had been attempting to clean the kitchen ahead of the holidays, but ended up creating a potentially lethal concoction.

The US-based social media user said that her family was forced to call poison control after the mistake before being instructed to all stick together in one room. 

TikToker Samantha discovered the hard way that combining cleaning supplies does not make them stronger and, in fact, makes them poisonous

TikToker Samantha discovered the hard way that combining cleaning supplies does not make them stronger and, in fact, makes them poisonous 

In her viral video, Samantha pans her camera around the room where her family - including the dog - had gathered with the door firmly shut

The clip has so far amassed more than 21.5 million views

In her viral video, which has amassed more than 21.5 million views, Samantha pans her camera around the room where her family – including the dog – had gathered with the door firmly shut 

In her viral video, which has amassed more than 21.5 million views, Samantha pans her camera around the room where her family – including the dog – have gathered with the door firmly shut.

She then flips the camera onto herself before pulling a knowingly guilty face.

On the top of the video, she writes: ‘I accidentally cleaned the kitchen with bleach and vinegar and now we’re all stuck in the same room on the phone with poison control.’   

Uploading the video on Christmas Day, she jokingly captioned the clip: ‘My grandparents were just gassed to be spending time with us.’ 

Thankfully, Samantha and her family made it out of the situation unscathed, but mixing bleach and vinegar is no laughing matter.

Don’t mix! The deadly effects of mixing vinegar and bleach 

  • Mixing bleach and vinegar creates a chlorine gas, which can be fatal if inhaled at high concentrations
  • Vinegar is a diluted acetic acid and when mixed with bleach, it creates poisonous gas that is released into the surrounding air
  • If you inhale chlorine gas, it enters your mouth, throat, and lungs. It also exposes your ‘eyes and other mucus membranes’
  • Usual symptoms include coughing; irritation or burning in the nose, eyes and throat; difficulty breathing; a tight feeling in your chest; watery eyes; and nausea or vomiting
  • According to experts, these symptoms can begin immediately after you have been exposed to the gas or be delayed
  • The severity of symptoms depends on how long you were exposed to the gas, as well as surrounding ventilation

Combining the two solutions creates chlorine gas, which can be fatal if inhaled at high concentrations. 

The TikTok creator’s cautionary tale shocked users as many of them had no idea the concoction was deadly.

Vinegar is a diluted acetic acid and when mixed with bleach, it creates poisonous gas that is released into the surrounding air. 

Dr Kelly Johnson-Arbor, a medical toxicology physician and interim executive director at the National Capital Poison Center, told Today that many make this ‘common’ mistake. 

According to the America’s Poison Centers’ National Poison Data System annual report, there were 4,800 single-substance exposures to chlorine gas – defined as mixing an acid household product with bleach – called into poison centers. 

Johnson-Arbor noted that the errors are usually the result of ‘well-intentioned and unaware adults trying to clean.’ 

If you inhale chlorine gas, it enters your mouth, throat, and lungs, and exposes your ‘eyes and other mucus membranes,’ according to Johnson-Arbor. 

When you are exposed to the gas, it irritates airways and can cause permanent damage. 

Usual symptoms include coughing; irritation or burning in the nose, eyes, and throat; difficulty breathing; a tight feeling in your chest; watery eyes; and nausea or vomiting. 

According to experts, these symptoms can either begin immediately after you have been exposed to the gas or may be delayed. 

The severity of symptoms depends on how long you were exposed to the gas, as well as the surrounding ventilation. 

Johnson-Arbor noted that there have been cases where those exposed to the gas become extremely ill and are hospitalized for a week or more. 

In severe and fatal cases, a person could develop buildup of fluid in the lungs, but Johnson-Arbor was keen to stress that these were rare.

‘People who are young and otherwise healthy can most likely just get out into a well-ventilated area, and their symptoms should go away pretty quickly,’ Johnson-Arbor told Today. 

Thankfully, Samantha and her family made it out of the situation unscathed, but mixing the bleach and vinegar is no laughing matter

Thankfully, Samantha and her family made it out of the situation unscathed, but mixing the bleach and vinegar is no laughing matter 

If you are exposed to chlorine gas, the first thing you should do is get yourself and others out of the area.

Prior to returning to the exposed area, ensure that the room is well-ventilated by opening the windows and door to let fresh air in. 

According to Johnson-Arbor, those who clear the area and get fresh air should be OK in 10 to 15 minutes. 

If symptoms don’t go away or get worse, you should seek medical attention. 

You should also contact poison control by calling 1.800.222.1222 or visit PoisonHelp.org.  

Once your symptoms have disappeared and the area has been thoroughly ventilated, you can dispose of the chlorine gas by pouring it down the drain. 

‘People should only use cleaning products as directed on the package label, and only for the way that they’re meant to be used,’ Johnson-Arbor said.

Kaitlyn Brown, PharmD, clinical managing director of America’s Poison Centers, also told the publication that the number of chemical exposures occurred by mixing household cleaners had seemingly ‘peaked in 2021.’ 

Brown explained that this was most likely due to the pandemic, but continued to warn to people to avoid mixing bleach with any household chemical. 



Post source: Daily mail

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