Who is Destiny Pastor Brian Tamaki

Covid 19 Delta outbreak: Who is Destiny Pastor Brian Tamaki – Destiny Church is led by Brian Tamaki and his wife Hannah Tamaki, who hold the positions of Visionary and Senior Ministers. Their three adult children Jasmine, Jamie, and Samuel are all actively involved in the church ministry. Samuel and his wife pastor the Destiny church in Gold Coast Australia, Jamie, and her husband are the CEO of ManUp and Legacy International, Jasmine and her husband facilitate social services within the ManUp and Legacy organization.

Brian and Hannah have 5 generations of their family in Destiny Church. Following a unanimous agreement by the then 19 other pastors of Destiny Churches throughout New Zealand, Tamaki was ordained as a “bishop” during a ceremony performed by kaumatua and Destiny Pastor.  Manuel Renata on 18 June 2005.

 

Who is Destiny Pastor Brian Tamaki

 

Tamaki wore a Korowai (a traditional feathered cloak symbolizing chiefly authority) for his ordination in 2005 as Bishop of the Destiny Church. He is seen here beside his wife Hannah (second left) and Richard Lewis (far right), leader of the Destiny New Zealand political party. The party was formed in 2003 and gained 14,000 votes in the 2005 general election but was deregistered in 2007.

The church’s leadership encourages obedience to its teachings, and its rhetoric has sometimes alienated other churches that have different approaches to Christianity. In 2003, Tamaki, in what he described as a prophetic utterance, predicted that Destiny would be “ruling the nation” within five years.

A defiant Brian Tamaki has issued a message to his supporters, claiming he stands for all New Zealanders ahead of his first court appearance today on charges of organizing a mass anti-lockdown protest in Auckland.

Tamaki took to social media this morning, describing the effects of lockdown as “carnage” and promising to take his fight to the High Court.

“I STAND today for all NZers who believe our “FREEDOMS AND RIGHTS” should never be removed, negated or violated, but protected and preserved,” Tamaki wrote.

“We would never be seeing the social-carnage we are today if our Bill of Rights had teeth,” he argued, claiming that lockdowns had brought “a divided nation, job loss, busted businesses, mental illness and anguish” among other ill effects.

He told supporters he wanted to later argue his rights in the High Court, promising to “take this Government to task on being accountable for its violations and abuses”.

This morning’s statement comes after Tamaki used an online sermon last night to describe new vax mandates as part of a “war of words” which he described as “World War 3”.

The rally earlier this month saw as many as 2000 anti-lockdown protesters gather on the field and steps in front of the Auckland War Memorial Museum.

Brian Tamaki vows to defend police charges for Auckland anti-lockdown protest

Destiny Church leader Brian Tamaki says he is “surprised” after being charged by police for organising a mass anti-lockdown protest in Auckland – and he will defend the charges.

It a written statement this evening, the 63-year-old said he was today visited by two police officers informing him he would be charged with breaching the Covid-19 Public Health Response Act 2020 and Alert Level 3 Order.

Tamaki indicated he intends to defend the charges. He is set to appear at the Auckland District Court on October 12.

Police said earlier today a 63-year-old man had been summonsed to appear on charges relating to organising the rally that took place in Auckland Domain. The rally on Saturday saw as many as 2000 anti-lockdown protesters gather on the field and steps in front of the Auckland War Memorial Museum.

Police said the gathering was in breach of alert level 3 restrictions, and their investigation is ongoing.

Further charges or enforcement action against others involved in the event were being considered, police said.

“Police acknowledge that the taking place of this event was frustrating for our communities and we want to assure people that the police response on the day was planned and based on operational assessments as is usual for an event of that size,” Superintendent Shanan Gray said.

“Police decision-making when it comes to these types of events will always be about community safety first and foremost.”

Tonight, Tamaki said he was charged on the basis that he organised an outdoors gathering during level 3.

“Today, I had a visit from two officers from the New Zealand Police at my home informing
me that I was to be charged with two offences under the ever-changing laws passed by
the Government now known as the Covid-19 Public Health Response (Alert Level
Requirements) Order (No 12),” Tamaki said.

“I am prepared to stand up and be heard when I see injustice and suffering.”

In the statement, he said he is “certainly not afraid to do so on any occasion, let alone at this vital time”.

Tamaki says he stands behinds his actions and he will “defend” his involvement.

“My community, my people, are too important for me to ignore the pain being caused by the government’s current policies,” he said.

“The lockdowns and current levels are damaging our people, and it cannot continue. I cannot stand by quietly and let it happen.”

Tamaki said it will be a “sad day” when “speaking up against what is wrong” is unlawful.

“Surely, we all agree with that, whether you agree with my views or the many thousands of ordinary New Zealanders who also agree with me on the important issues that I have spoken of.”

Tamaki said he was surprised to be charged given he had worked alongside police before the event.

Tamaki said no issues or concerns were raised during Saturday’s event.

He said he is “disappointed” with the action police have taken and believes it was done due to public pressure.

“That itself has been driven by the media who should themselves be holding the Government to account.

“Instead, as we can see, the media seek only to villainise the genuine efforts of others to raise and prevent the current suffering of our people.”

The protest had earlier been condemned by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Auckland Mayor Phil Goff, who said he supported sanctions against the church leader.

Ardern had earlier said the protest was “a slap in the face” to Aucklanders who had been following the rules for weeks.

The Prime Minister confirmed the protest was illegal but would not say if there should have been arrests, saying it was an operational matter for the police.

Tamaki on social media hit back at Ardern’s comments.

“If any true democracy-loving caring NZer … value their Freedoms (sic) and the Freedoms of their children’s children, you should never be angry at people who want to recover what’s priceless and beyond value, and protect them,” Tamaki said on Facebook.

“What price do you put on your personal Freedoms? Why would you hate us for that? As for the pathetic cry, you will cause a super-spread is unreasonable panic.

“You’re vaccinated, not in the vicinity, and safe in your bubble, you then should be thanking us, who took the courageous risk, in the face of restrictions, to push back on oppressive laws from this Government.”

As many as 2000 anti-lockdown protesters gathered, with the crowd including families with young babies on picnic chairs.

 

Defiant Brian Tamaki says NZ should be thankful for anti-lockdown protest

Brian Tamaki is defiant about holding an anti-lockdown protest attended by up to 2000 on Saturday – saying people should be thanking him and his supporters for standing up against the Government’s “oppressive laws”.

In a Facebook post, he also hit back at Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern for describing the protest as “a slap in the face for all Aucklanders”.

Meanwhile, a petition on change.org has garnered nearly 25,000 signatures calling for Tamaki to be charged for organising the event on Saturday outside the Auckland War Memorial Museum while Auckland was in lockdown alert level 3.

Who is Destiny Pastor Brian Tamaki?
Who is Destiny Pastor Brian Tamaki? – Photo / Dean Purcell

“If any true democracy-loving caring NZer…value their Freedoms (sic) and the Freedoms of their children’s children, you should never be angry at people who want to recover what’s priceless and beyond value, and protect them,” Tamaki said on Facebook.

“What price do you put on your personal Freedoms? Why would you hate us for that? As for the pathetic cry, you will cause a super-spread is unreasonable panic.

“You’re vaccinated, not in the vicinity, and safe in your bubble, you then should be thanking us, who took the courageous risk, in the face of restrictions, to push back on oppressive laws from this Government.”

Who is Destiny Pastor Brian Tamaki? - Photo / Dean Purcell
Who is Destiny Pastor Brian Tamaki? – Photo / Dean Purcell

Tamaki said he would rather “live in dangerous freedom than live in peaceful slavery”.

He accused the Ardern Government of creating laws to break existing laws to further remove civil rights and freedom and its “abusive use of political power to neutralise our Bill of Rights”.

“Who is ‘morally wrong’ now Prime Minister?” Tamaki asked.

A petition on change.org calling on Police Commissioner Andrew Coster to charge Tamaki and those who attended the rally.

“All involved were in breach of the current regulations covering groups and gatherings,” the petition said.

“To date, the New Zealand Police response over Tamaki’s actions has been abysmal. Please show your support to send the message that we want out of lockdown and acknowledge that with events like these occurring this will potentially impact on our Christmas holiday period separating family and friends unnecessarily all for the ego and wallet of one very selfish individual.”

It said Tamaki had flouted the rules “since day one” and was actively encouraging others to break the rules and continues to disrupt our Covid recovery efforts.

“Send a message that this is NOT OK!”

Ardern had labelled the actions of Tamaki and those who attended the anti-lockdown protest as “morally wrong”.

As many as 2000 anti-lockdown protesters gathered, with the crowd ranging from gang members to grannies. There were families – including with young babies – on picnic chairs.

Others included people in wheelchairs and some walking dogs, while a series of motorbikes were parked to the side along with two or three tractors.

Ardern said the protest was “a slap in the face” to Aucklanders who had been following the rules for weeks.

The Prime Minister confirmed the protest was illegal but would not say if there should have been arrests, saying it was an operational matter for the police.

The Herald has approached the police for further comments.

14 things you might not know about Destiny Church - Who is Destiny Pastor Brian Tamaki?
Who is Destiny Pastor Brian Tamaki?

14 things you might not know about Destiny Church

Formed in 1998, Destiny Church was founded by Bishop Brian Tamaki in a small garage in Auckland’s Pakuranga. In the mid to late 2000s there were claims Destiny Church had close to 10,000 members and followers.

From controversy to their highly popular and beneficial project “Man-Up”, Destiny has remained in the news for a number of years.

But what do we know about Destiny Church? Here are 14 things you may not know about the church and its leader.

1. Destiny Church started from humble beginnings before membership rose and then fell

Destiny Church was launched on July 4, 1998 in a small commercial warehouse in Pakuranga. The church began as a group of 20 people, mostly people from Tamaki’s previous church, Lake City Church in Rotorua. It quickly grew in popularity and peaked in 2003 when there were over 10,000 supporters – although Tamaki maintains that there were never more than around 5000 members – and 19 churches around the country. In less than a decade, eight churches closed and membership was down to around 3000.

2. Destiny Church has expanded into Australia

Destiny Church has two Australian branches, one in Brisbane and one in the Gold Coast. The Australian church is run by Tamaki’s son Samuel Tamaki and his wife Kiri Tamaki.

3. Brian Tamaki’s first child was born out of wedlock

After dropping out of school at 15, Tamaki met Hannah Lee and the pair had their first child, Jasmine, in December 1978. They married two years later. Tamaki is open about the difficulties he faced during his early years when he dabbled in drugs and alcohol. The Destiny Church is now well known for its stance on conservative family values.

4. Brian Tamaki was ordained as ‘bishop’ in 2005

It cost $70 to attend the ordination of Brian Tamaki at the TelstraClear Pacific Events Centre in June 2005. The first Pentecostal bishop in New Zealand, Tamaki was anointed with oil by Manuel Renata – a kaumatua of his own church.

5. Members sign an oath of loyalty and obedience to Brian Tamaki

The covenant first gained public awareness in 2005 when 700 male members of the church took an oath to abide by it. The Protocols & Requirements Between Spiritual Father & His Spiritual Sons states that proof of their covenant was how they “submit to God’s chosen man… Spiritual fathers are extremely rare… For us it is about discerning the special anointing and function God has put on Bishop’s life”.

6. There is a protocol for interacting with Brian Tamaki

As a part of the protocols and requirements document, there is a section called “Conduct Towards Bishop”. It includes details about how to properly interact with Tamaki, such as always being respectful and never being “in his face”. Other instructions include stopping talking when Tamaki speaks, never disagreeing with him in front of others and standing when he and his wife enter a room and seating only after they have seated.

7. Brian Tamaki once thought Destiny Church would rule New Zealand

In a 2003 Destiny Church conference, Tamaki prophesied, “in the next five years by the time we hit our tenth anniversary, and I don’t say this lightly, but we will be ruling the nation…this will be the first nation historically in the world to be under the governance of God”.

8. Destiny Church members formed a political party in 2003

Destiny New Zealand was a Christian political party centred on the charismatic/Pentecostal Destiny Church. The party described itself as “centre-right” and placed a strong focus on socially conservative values and argued that the breakdown of the traditional family was a primary cause of many of New Zealand’s problems.

In the 2005 elections Destiny New Zealand received just 14,000 votes or 0.62 per cent of the vote. Party leader Richard Lewis was a manager of Destiny Social Services at Destiny Church. In 2007 Destiny New Zealand was disbanded.

Some confusion exists as to how closely the Destiny New Zealand party overlapped with the Destiny Church. According to Tamaki and Lewis the two remained quite separate, however, a number of former church members indicated Lewis was just a “frontman” for Tamaki.

9. Brian Tamaki blames earthquakes on gays, murderers and sinners

In 2016 Tamaki came under fire when he blamed a gay priest and the people of Christchurch for the devastating earthquakes that hit the region in 2010 and 2011 which killed 185 people. “The land actually speaks to God. Out of the soil … Abel’s blood spoke to God from a murder. The earth can speak. Leviticus says that the earth convulses under the weight of certain human sin.

“It spews itself up after a while – that’s natural disasters. Because nature was never created to carry the bondage of our iniquity,” Tamaki said.

10. Destiny Church is strongly patriarchal

With a strong focus on the patriarchal status of men, Tamaki links femininity with weakness. Much of the church’s work has gone into establishing males as leaders. From their website: “Just because you are born a male doesn’t necessarily mean you are a ‘man’ according to Christ’s standard of manhood. I am calling the man out of the male, the ‘husband’ out of the man and the ‘father’ out of the husband.”

Their women’s group, on the other hand, supports charities and raises money for people in need.

In a video on their website, Tamaki states, “There is a kingdom advance that has shifted in its spiritual intensity. What was before that was weak, lame, effeminate, soft, he says has now changed.”

 

11. Destiny Church opens its doors to patched gang members

Destiny Church says its "Man-Up" programme is helping thousands of men, including former gang members, improve social behaviour and help tackle domestic violence. Photo / Destiny Church
Destiny Church says its “Man-Up” programme is helping thousands of men, including former gang members, improve social behaviour and help tackle domestic violence. Photo / Destiny Church

 

Early in 2017 Destiny Church opened up its doors to patched gang members. Gang members are usually discouraged from attending the church while wearing their patches, but an exception was made for those interested in hearing the Easter message. Former gang members shared their stories of rape, murder, and drugs – and how Destiny helped them turn their lives around.

Hannah Tamaki said former gang members are among thousands of men being helped in 93 weekly groups across New Zealand and Australia following the launch of a project called “Man-Up” – an initiative focused on tackling family violence, depression, obesity, addiction and suicide.

12. Destiny Church has a strong belief in prosperity theology

Advocates of prosperity theology believe that faith, positive speech and donations to churches will increase one’s own wealth. This view has encouraged a 10 per cent tithing within the church, and the creation of an annual “First Fruits” offering in October to provide Tamaki with members gifting between $350,000 and $500,000.

There has been dissent both within and outside the church about Tamaki’s opulent lifestyle and how members of the church have been left struggling financially.

 

13. Destiny Church has received hundreds of thousands of taxpayer dollars

The church has applied for, and received $860,000 for their youth programmes. The Ministry of Social Development provided the money for four Community Max programmes in Auckland, Waikato and Bay of Plenty for 79 youth.

Despite their public stance on homosexuality, women, and money, both Minister for Social Development Paula Bennett and Whanau Ora minister Tariana Turia did not see that there was an issue with funding youth programmes from Destiny.

Turia commented to the Herald in 2011 – “I would never, ever discriminate against Destiny Church. My firm belief is that they do a really great job. We contracted them for Community Max, they did a great job, they do a great job with families, they run an excellent kura.”

14. Destiny Church raises members to be ready for war

The church has repeatedly stated that it wants power since the Enough is Enough march on Parliament in 2004 against civil unions and a DVD claiming the government was “evil” with a “radical homosexual agenda”.

Their website says, “It’s time for true men of God to take their place as the leaders in our families and our communities.”

Their Men’s Ministry, Momentum, states it is “a covenant community of Destiny’s men committed to Christ and the vision of Destiny Churches.”

The last of five of the covenants is: “To raise men, fit for war.”